Looking for a challenge?

A menu filled with 144 challenge problems is within arms reach at all times. These problems have been carefully chosen by Mr. Colby from National Council of Teachers of Mathematics publications, and various other resources. These problems have three levels of difficulty: challenging, very challenging, and very very challenging.
 

    Students may browse the menu of problems at any appropriate time before, during, or after class (including time at home). The complete menu of problems is available for download as a PDF file by clicking on the image directly below this text box. Each student has a challenge completion matrix in the back of their math binder. This matrix document is also available by clicking the matrix image below and to the right. 


    Students may submit their solutions (with work shown of course) to the back of their team file at any time. Please be certain to always include your name and the problem number. Mr. Colby will grade each solution and return it to the front of the file. Correct solutions will earn stickers on the solution and the challenge matrix. Incorrect solutions will be returned with feedback and may be completed and resubmitted at any time. By completing rows, columns, or diagonals of the matrix, student earn extra tickets for the weekly prize drawing. The number of tickets earned depends on the difficulty level of that row, column, or diagonal.

 

At the bottom of this page you will also find the Game of the Year expressions challenge. This puzzle will be updated in the classroom and on this page as students discover and submit new expressions.

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Game of the Year

Every year, we play a mathematical expressions game using digits from a specific year.

 

This school year we will use digits from the year 1993.

 

Students are challenged to write mathematical expressions that, when simplified, will result in

each of the values from 0 to 99 inclusive. Students must create these expressions using each of the digits 1, 9, 9, and 3. These are the only digits that may be used and they must be used in that specific order. Students may use any mathematical symbols including grouping symbols. Concatenation is also encouraged. For example, the first 1 and 9 can be written together to form the number 19.  

 

Here is one example and one non-example to clarify the rules:

 

Example: 19 - (9+3)  would be a valid expression for the value 7.

Non-Example: 99 - 1 - 3  does simplify to the value 95, and each digit was used, but the digits were not used in the correct order.

 

As students identify expressions on the game board in the classroom, I will also update the electronic game board below. I'm very curious to see which student and what class period can identify the most expressions this year.